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JEWELLERY

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GLITTERS & SPARKLES

The ancient Indian art of jewellery making

features distinct styles, designs, materials

and techniques

mong its rich art forms,

India’s tradition of exquisite

handcrafted jewellery is

world renowned. One would

be hard-pressed to find an

Indian woman who doesn’t

covet that

kundan

choker, a

naulakha

haar

(traditional Indian necklace),

polki

jhumkas

(traditional Indian earrings)

or a pair of exquisite

jadau kangans

(traditional Indian bangles).

Traditional Indian jewellery, unlike

the limited repertoire of the West, is

fashioned to fit just about every part of

the body, right from your hair to your

hip and toes. And considering how vast

the nation is, jewellery making as an art

form has given rise to distinctive styles,

designs, materials and techniques.

And all this is made richer by the

regional differences, depending on the

A

BY SANAYA PAVRI

A tribute to

traditions

geography, people, culture, and their

lifestyles. Take for instance the Meenakari

and Kundan styles of jewellery found in

the western state of Rajasthan that have

been influenced by the Mughal dynasty,

or the chunky gold jewellery from Tamil

Nadu and Kerala in southern India

that are inspired by nature. And while

Assamese jewellery in the north-east is

influenced by local flora and fauna as

well, Manipuri jewellery makers from the

same region make use of shells, claws,

teeth and precious stones in their designs.

Starting from the top

The exquisite and ornamental journey

of India’s fine art of jewellery making

begins at the northern most state

of Jammu and Kashmir. Traditional

jewellery here consists of huge circular

earrings called

kundalas

, and large

A L L T HAT G L I T T E R S

COD E : DV NK S UK L RP 0 1

WE I GH T : 1 2 0 GMS

PR I C E ON R E QUE S T